Archive

Maggie O’Farrell

This must be the placeThis Must Be The Place is a novel like a patchwork quilt that weaves together many stories, all starting out from the central character of Daniel, a linguistics professor from Brooklyn, who now lives in a remote area of Ireland with his wife Claudette. Claudette used to be a famous film star but notoriously disappeared from that world about 15 years ago and now lives a reclusive life in an isolated cottage with Daniel and her children. One day Daniel is listening to the radio when he hears an interview which reveals to him a shocking fact about an incident from his student days. He has tried to put the incident behind him but now feels compelled to discover the truth about what happened years before.

The novel is told from many different points of view, moving back and forth in time and across the world. Each chapter starts with a different person, a year and a place, and although the narrative is told in the third person, we experience events through that particular character’s eyes. I really like the technique of different viewpoints when it is done well, as it is here. Each character has a distinctive voice and way of thinking that mostly feels true to life and makes the novel interesting to read. The leaps backwards and forwards in time kept me absorbed, as events from the past revealed more about Daniel and Claudette’s previous lives. Some chapters introduce new characters’ viewpoints or are set in unexpected time periods and I liked the unpredictability. These small glimpses into minor characters’ lives (for example, Maeve or Rosalind) left the rest of their stories untold, which I found intriguing.

I liked the complexity of the characters, particularly Daniel, Claudette and some of Daniel’s friends from his university days. I think one particular strength of this author is how she captures the way people’s family backgrounds and early life experiences can influence their later lives, without bludgeoning the reader over the head to make the point. The parts of the novel I liked the most were the depiction of the central incident which affected Daniel so much, the encounter with his friend Todd, and in general the stories of both Daniel’s and Claudette’s lives in their early twenties. I felt the novel describes vividly how it is (or was) to be a student or recent graduate. OK, so it’s set in glamorous environments but it captures realistic emotions and experiences from that time of life, both the excitement and the darker side. I was slightly less interested in Claudette’s experiences as a film star, although I liked the character of the director, Timou, who I imagined to be a Lars Von Trier figure, while Claudette would be more of an Isabelle Huppert! O’Farrell also experiments with different ways of telling the story, for example there is an interesting chapter which is written in the form of an auction catalogue at a sale of some of Claudette’s personal belongings.

Because of how much time, space and plot the book encompasses, it doesn’t seem to have a central theme and maybe the variety is the point. Perhaps the intention is simply to explore how this incident affects Daniel and his marriage, or to express how complicated and sprawling one person’s life can be, particularly today when global travel is more commonplace and people are less likely to stay in the same place they grew up, around the same people, for their whole lives. If I had a criticism, it would be that later in the book O’Farrell crams too many themes and issues into one family and it became slightly clicheed and superficial how complicated it all was. Despite this, in general I enjoyed the novel because of the main characters and central plotline. I wondered why O’Farrell chose the title This Must Be The Place and think maybe it expresses the sense of recognition that someone feels when they find home, either in a physical location or with a person. I am still thinking about the novel a couple of weeks later and will be looking for more books by Maggie O’Farrell.

Advertisements